Freedom of Science : Can Industry Influence What Scientists Publish?





Professorship/Faculty: Lehrstuhl für Klinische Psychologie/Psychotherapie
Author(s): Ziegler, Ralph; Schnell, Oliver; Kulzer, Bernd; Gilbart, James; Heinemann, Lutz
Pages / Size: S. 10 - 13
Title of the Journal: European Endocrinology
Language(s): English
ISSN: 1758-3780
Publisher Information: Goring-on-Thames
Issue: 10 (2014), 1
Publisher Information: Touch Medical Media
Year of publication: 2014
Abstract: 
The right of scientists to publish data from their preclinical and clinical studies is a much-cherished principle and is vital to the freedom of science. Indeed, full and candid reporting of results is essential for scientific advancement; without such disclosure research work would have much diminished purpose and no impact outside the centre or organisation where the work was conducted.1,2 Prevention of publication preserves ignorance and may cause other researchers to needlessly repeat work. This is also unethical as it requires that human beings are exposed to a certain risk associated with such studies again without need.
Disclosure: Ralph Ziegler has consulted and/or received honoraria from different diagnostic and pharmaceutical companies, including Roche Diagnostics. Oliver Schnell is a consultant for companies developing novel approaches in diabetes technology. Bernd Kulzer has consulted and/or received honoraria from different diagnostic and pharmaceutical companies, including Roche Diagnostics. James Gilbart is an employee of Touch Medical Media. Lutz Heinemann is a consultant for a number of diagnostic and pharmaceutical companies, including Roche Diagnostics.
DOI: 10.17925/EE.2014.10.01.i
URL: http://www.touchendocrinology.com/articles/freedom-science-can-industry-influence-what-scientists-publish
Document Type: Article
URI: https://fis.uni-bamberg.de/handle/uniba/39480
Release date: 18. August 2015


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